The Character of Plants, Nature Responds

baby cucumber taking its first firm hold.

baby cucumber taking its first firm hold.

 This baby cucumber growing past the indoor lights, reaching out it’s first tendril invokes the same thrill as when a baby grabs hold and curls its hand around it’s mothers pinky for the first time. How is that? Am I the only one who feels like this toward my plants? My baby cuke taking it’s first firm hold onto life. It’s bursting to climb, but I’m waiting for the good weather to come before setting it outside. I fear that weather may not come. It’s the end of May heading into June and exterior temperature last night was 3 degrees. Two nights in a row I have had to bring in those warm loving tomatoes and peppers, which are also aching to get into their final larger pots. Today’s temperatures hovered around 11 to 15 degrees celsius with gusting winds making it even cooler. I can’t say the tomatoes are enjoying the transitions from exterior to interior too much. They are equally sensitive as the cucumbers. The first night I brought them in they withered slightly from the interior heat, then when they were put out in the morning their leaves severely curved in reaction to the wind, and I feared they were lost, but they perked up and made a full recovery after a few hours. I have seen the tomatoes leaves curl this way before, but was puzzled as to what the problem could be. Now I know it’s a self defense mechanism against the wind or extremes.
One of the joys of plants is discovering the individual characters of each new addition. Its sensitivities, requirements, how it thrives. After transplanting the cuke into a larger pot, I saw the tendril reaching out and hanging in mid air an inch away from the stake. I had not yet tied it to the stake. I turned my head for one moment occupied with other plants. When I turned back the tendril had a hold onto the stake. When I came back later, it had several more coils firmly wrapped. Sometimes when it’s quiet you can actually hear them pushing and pulling, a leaf brushing past another, a blossom falling.
A curious thing had also happened during winter with the calendulas. Growing indoors the calendulas were blossoming under artificial lights, but they were few and far between. Having only one blossom to work with one day, and wanting to save some petals for my omelets and not take the whole flower, I decided to pluck only half the petals, and leave the other half of the petals still on the stem. I felt pretty weird about it though, and stared at the half naked flower. I wondered how the plant felt about it. I found out how it felt, when the next blossom came out. It reacted by only growing half a blossom! I could hardly believe it, and wish now I had taken a snap. It responded by stunting its growth on half of the next blossom! Since I didn’t want to encourage this behavior, I never plucked in this fashion again. Now it’s back to full blossoms again. These plants amazed me when I first grew them by how they closed up in the evenings. They may move slower than we do, but they are certainly moving and being active quite a bit. I love when each plant shows itself in its true character. They are always responding and being so purely alive and true.

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Incredible Stunning Morning

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blocked sky May 15, 2015

When I went to water the plants this morning my mouth dropped at the huge amounts of chemtrails already in progress. It was in a little bit of a double shock because I suddenly came to the realization without any doubts, that we are indeed being slow killed for population control. It would have been a beautiful day, without the chemtrail interference. Mid May already and today it’s cold outside. The trees and plant life, and any life for that matter are not getting enough sun, or warmth, and are being bombarded with metal poisoning. And who is doing this? I would be prone to say the government/military, but the truth is we have no government, tho plenty of military- being its own corporation. We only have a bunch of corrupt corporations pretending to be government, who have been allowed, through our own apathy to run a muck and destroy this planet. Seems these corporations have bought their way into controlling every aspect of our lives through force and intimidation. Corporations, cold fictions that men have created, an ego driven, title based type mania with no respect for life. Just because it’s done slowly doesn’t make it any less murder. In full view, the Agenda 21, the corporations jointly cooperating, and implementing the policies world wide. The people unable to grasp what type of web we have been cast into, unable to comprehend the evil intentions against us. How can we do anything when we are busy working and giving our hard earned money to these corporations, and barely just surviving ourselves? With absolute malicious fore thought and intent the people are kept drained of their own resources to survive.

blocked sky May 15, 2015

blocked sky May 15, 2015

It is not the corporations, but the will of men that go out and get in their planes and spray the population. It is the will of men to participate to commit these criminal acts purchasing these chemicals, filling the containers daily.

Nobody wants to look at it, our own murder; we want to look at the cute cuddly distractions to make ourselves feel better. Yes it’s important to feel good and embrace positivity. We need that in order to compare and contrast the deep depression we are in, so we can again know how to live life, to remind ourselves how good it can be, but we need to be careful to find a balance with the reality of what truly is going on.  While we are watching the cute and cuddly looking for joy, learning once again how to be whole, we are avoiding holding these men who willingly participate in this destruction, accountable for their actions.

 

Gift in the Pot

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While preparing my pots doing spring garden cleaning, and turning over the dirt, I discovered some gifts from the squirrels. Yup, peanuts buried in there, one to each pot, 2 in the last one. During winter I saw a squirrel that looked rather sickly to me. Its nose was all runny, bearing its teeth, and had the head very close to the ground of the railing it was sitting on. It refused to leave, even after a couple of firm nudges. I thought maybe it was really old, or it had a cold. It almost looked like it was falling asleep, or couldn’t go on. It hadn’t occurred to me that yes, squirrels can get old too! I was quite concerned for its health. But I needn’t be, it was more that it WOULDN’T go on. I just saw the same squirrel running about bearing a very fat winter tummy, looking quite boisterous. The reason it didn’t want to leave, was probably because it had just buried its nuts in my pots, or trying to retrieve them, and it would explain the low bearing teeth posture, probably in defense mode.
I threw the nuts back out to them, and am trying to figure out a natural way to keep the squirrels at bay, and away from my garden. Funny though, the pots didn’t appear to be rustled through, they had hay mulch over them which were undisturbed, and the nuts were buried quite deep. I don’t know how they accomplished it without making a mess.

spinach-01Part of the spinach crop this year. These were transplanted from indoor seedlings, and are taking quite awhile to establish. Not much sun on the balcony, and it was quite a cold April, with only one or two warmer days. Those are egg shells for mulch, to help reflect more light onto the leaves, and keep some of the excess heat out during the day, and heat in during the night. I double cupped them, using old cups from last year, due to the near freezing temperatures at night. Poked some pin holes in the sides to keep some air circulation.
I notice the gnats and bugs in general are attracted to the black color of the earth. More and more mulching seems the way to go for multiple reasons. I am also hoping to detract some of the bugs with the white color of the egg shells.
Some of my home made compost had spider mites, darn! I scooped the bulk of them off the top surface when transplanting, as I couldn’t let my winter compost go to waste. I have noticed that there are fewer spider mites in the glass pots, and more in the plastic ones. I am concluding that they might be finding the glass too slippery. Believe it or not, I spend some extra time in the evening hand picking the remainder out with a pointy blade while the population is still low. They just crawl onto the blade and then I squish them between my fingers off the blade, being ever so careful not to cut myself. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Funny, I would never dream of squishing any type of bug between my fingers a couple of years ago. It appears that I am starting to relax about bugs. But only I think because these are so small, and it seems to be the most practical way so far. It’s giving my eyes quite a work out too. I really don’t want to be spraying anything. Until I figure something else out, this seems to be keeping their numbers down, there are only the odd two or three now. If I had more cash I probably would go for some predatory insects, to do the job for me.

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